Tag Archives: Cat

Nursing Clinics

Microchipping: We recommend microchipping your pet to protect it from theft or loss. It is a simple procedure which only takes a few seconds and is relatively painless.

Nail clipping: We sell nail clippers in our waiting room but, if you find nail clipping difficult, then we will be happy to help.

Puppy parties: We run monthly puppy parties where your puppy can socialise with new people and other puppies, as well as trying some training. Leave your name with our receptionists if you’re interested and we’ll send you an invitation for the next session.

Behaviour: We have nurses who take a special interest in behaviour and can help with most behavioural problems.

Weight: We can help you monitor your pet’s weight and recommend diets for weight loss.

Bereavement: Our staff can help you and your family move on after the loss of a pet.

 

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

Adder bites in dogs

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The only venomous snake native to the UK is the European adder. They can be 50cm long with a black/brown zigzag pattern along their back and V shaped marking on the back of the head. They are commonly found on dry sandy heaths, sand dunes, rocky hillsides, moorland and woodland edges.

Snakes generally only bite in self-defence when stood on or disturbed. Bites are more common in the spring or summer, when snakes are more active.

Symptoms of a snake bite:

Adder bites will present as a dark-coloured, localised swelling with 2 small puncture marks in the centre. They most commonly occur on the face and legs. Your dog may appear to be nervous or in pain. They may have pale gums, bruising, dribbling, vomiting, diarrhoea, dehydration, restlessness, drowsiness and lethargy. Eventually dogs may collapse, have blood clotting problems, tremors or convulsions.

What to do if your dog has a snake bite:

Seek veterinary attention IMMEDIATELY if your dog is bitten. Carry your dog (rather than letting him walk) to reduce the spread of the venom and bathe the wound in cold water to control the swelling. Try to keep your dog calm and warm as you transport them to the vet.

The vet will give your dog pain relief, treat the swelling and administer anti-venom if available. Most cases survive with appropriate treatment.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

Kitten behaviour

Kittens

Make sure your kitten is handled daily and has lots of contact with you. Teach them from an early age to allow you to look in their mouths and ears, feel their paws and examine their entire body for problems.

Keep them confined until they are litter trained and then allow them access to the rest of the house under supervision at first. Make sure you have a litter tray available for them to use at all times, including at night.

Most cats will become quite territorial and enjoy having their own space or ‘isolation field’ where they feel safe, so make sure you give your kitten a private place to go to when it doesn’t want to be disturbed. Cats will also leave scent marks around pathways in the house to act as familiar landmarks, so make sure you don’t remove all of your kitten’s scent marks as this will leave them feeling anxious.

Cats love to play hunt and you can join in with this to teach your kitten to control its biting and scratching. A lack of stimulation and play can cause your kitten to show aggression to any moving object, including your feet, so make sure you have lots of things to keep them entertained. We have lots of cat toys available in our waiting room for you to try.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets.

Our Laboratory

Lab

We have our own laboratory on site which means a lot of the blood tests and urine samples that need to be run can be done within 20 minutes. This is very helpful in that we can often know what is wrong with pets within half an hour and start treatment straight away. Normally we would have to wait at least 1-2 days to get results if we have to send samples away to an external laboratory for analysis.

We can do blood tests for the assessment of the kidneys, liver, glucose, red and white blood cells and electrolytes. Thyroid, cortisol, pancreatic enzymes and bacterial cultures and antibiograms can also be run at our practice. Having our own microscope helps us to analyse blood smears, faecal smears for parasites and urine samples so we can see if there are bacteria or crystals present in the urine.

Should we need to send away specialised samples such as feathers for bird sexing, histopathology or other tests we have a lab that collects regularly.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at www.tiptreevets.co.uk or www.willows-vets.co.uk

X-rays

Xray

It is not always easy to see what is going on inside the body and so we may suggest an x-ray for your pet to help determine what is wrong. X-rays can be helpful in identifying the sizes of organs and if there is gas present and also we may see some foreign objects such as if your pet has swallowed a stone or eaten part of a bone.

We rely on the pets being perfectly still to get good radiographs. The best way is usually a general anaesthetic or a deep sedation as we are not allowed by law to expose any of our staff or owners to radiation.

As we have a state of the art digital processor it allows very rapid development of the radiographs and less time for pets to be under general anaesthetic. These radiographs can be easily stored for any future reference as they are stored digitally.

X-rays are very useful to see broken bones, arthritis, enlarged hearts, and some of the abdominal organs. Once we know the organs involved we will often do further tests such as ultrasound, endoscopy or histopathology to diagnose the cause of the disease.

If we take x-rays of your pet we will always try to show you on the radiograph what is going on. You will be free to ask any questions and we will do our best to help you understand your pet’s condition.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at www.tiptreevets.co.uk or www.willows-vets.co.uk

A guide to first vaccinations

Don with two kittens

Immunity and vaccination

Immunity is the body’s natural ability to fight infection. Puppies and kittens are usually protected during the first few weeks, thanks to immunity passed through the mother’s first milk. However this immunity fades rapidly, leaving them suseptible to disease. Vaccinations increase the likelihood of immunity by exposing the body to a small, harmless dose of the disease.

Initial vaccinations

Puppies need 2 injections at 8 and 10 weeks of age. Breeds susceptible to Parvovirus should get a third vaccination at 16 weeks of age. The first annual vaccination at 15 months is critical.

Kittens need 2 injections at 9 and 12 weeks of age. The first annual vaccination is very important.

Rabbits need 2 injections at 6 and 8 weeks of age.

When your pet has their vaccinations, the vet will also give them a general health check.

Meeting other pets

It is important that puppies and kittens learn to socialise with other animals. It is important to wait a couple of weeks after the vaccinations for immunity to develop. The vet will then let you know that your pet is ready to meet others.

Vaccinations in Adult Animals

Immunity to diseases may fade. It’s therefore necessary for your pet to have booster vaccinations.

Dogs should be vaccinated every 2 years against Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus and Parainfluenza and every year against Leptospirosis and Bordetella. They should also be vaccinated against Rabies every 2 years if travelling.

Cats should be vaccinated yearly against Rhinotracheitis, Leukemia and Calici virus. They should also be vaccinated every 2 years against Rabies if travelling and Parvovirus. We also recommend vaccinations against Bordetella and Chlamydia in breeding colonies.

Rabbits should be vaccinated against Myxomatosis every 6 months and VHD every year. Ferrets should be vaccinated against Distemper every year.

Vaccination records

You’ll be given a certificate that contains a record of the vaccination and tells your when your next booster is due. You will need this certificate when attending boarding kennels, training classes and your vet, so make sure you keep it in a safe place.

 

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at www.tiptreevets.co.uk or www.willows-vets.co.uk.

Endoscopy

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Endoscopy is a way of looking into the body without doing surgery. It uses fibre optics to shine a light into organs such as the stomach, to see if there is anything abnormal. It is possible to see foreign objects or we can see if there is any pathology such as growths.

Small objects can be retrieved using the forceps in the endoscope. A computer screen can be used to visualise all that is going on.

We have rigid endoscopy and flexible endoscopy which gives us a good choice of treatments. Rigid endoscopy is one where the endoscope cannot bend and this can be used in the ear or colon. The flexible endoscope can be manipulated so that the end part can move. This would be used behind the soft palate or around the stomach.

Endoscopy usually requires an anaesthetic but can be very helpful in working out what is going on without using very invasive techniques.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at www.tiptreevets.co.uk or www.willows-vets.co.uk