Category Archives: Uncategorized

Veterinary Poisons Information Service: Fabric Washing Capsules and e-cigarettes.

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The Veterinary Poisons Information Service has highlighted two products which may be a risk to your pet; fabric washing capsules and e-cigarettes/ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems).

Fabric Washing Capsules/liquitabs

These may be eaten by pets if dropped on the floor or visible in kitchen cupboards. The jelly-like presentation may encourage curious animals to play with the liquitabs until they eventually burst in the animals mouth.

Recently the VPIS was contacted about a Staffordshire Bull Terrier who had bit through a liquitab. He became depressed and started vomiting over night. When he presented at the vets the next morning, he was severely dehydrated with pale gums and aspiration pneumonia. He developed renal failure and had convulsions. He died 2 hours after presentation, approximately 24 hours after ingestion.

e-cigarettes/ENDS

The liquids in e-cigarettes have been shown to be serious or fatal to both humans and dogs. E-cigarettes and their refills contain large doses of nicotine (up to 36mg per ml). Nicotine in all forms is highly toxic.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

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Nursing Clinics

Microchipping: We recommend microchipping your pet to protect it from theft or loss. It is a simple procedure which only takes a few seconds and is relatively painless.

Nail clipping: We sell nail clippers in our waiting room but, if you find nail clipping difficult, then we will be happy to help.

Puppy parties: We run monthly puppy parties where your puppy can socialise with new people and other puppies, as well as trying some training. Leave your name with our receptionists if you’re interested and we’ll send you an invitation for the next session.

Behaviour: We have nurses who take a special interest in behaviour and can help with most behavioural problems.

Weight: We can help you monitor your pet’s weight and recommend diets for weight loss.

Bereavement: Our staff can help you and your family move on after the loss of a pet.

 

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

Adder bites in dogs

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The only venomous snake native to the UK is the European adder. They can be 50cm long with a black/brown zigzag pattern along their back and V shaped marking on the back of the head. They are commonly found on dry sandy heaths, sand dunes, rocky hillsides, moorland and woodland edges.

Snakes generally only bite in self-defence when stood on or disturbed. Bites are more common in the spring or summer, when snakes are more active.

Symptoms of a snake bite:

Adder bites will present as a dark-coloured, localised swelling with 2 small puncture marks in the centre. They most commonly occur on the face and legs. Your dog may appear to be nervous or in pain. They may have pale gums, bruising, dribbling, vomiting, diarrhoea, dehydration, restlessness, drowsiness and lethargy. Eventually dogs may collapse, have blood clotting problems, tremors or convulsions.

What to do if your dog has a snake bite:

Seek veterinary attention IMMEDIATELY if your dog is bitten. Carry your dog (rather than letting him walk) to reduce the spread of the venom and bathe the wound in cold water to control the swelling. Try to keep your dog calm and warm as you transport them to the vet.

The vet will give your dog pain relief, treat the swelling and administer anti-venom if available. Most cases survive with appropriate treatment.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

Myxomatosis and Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD)

Soya and Danielle

Myxomatosis

Myxomatosis is a virus spread by fleas, mites and mosquitoes. Symptoms include puffy swellings around the face, blindness, high fever and usually death within 10-14 days. This condition is widespread in British wild rabbits. Since the disease us spread by biting insects, even indoor rabbits can be, and often are infected. There is no specific treatment and recovery is rare. It is therefore important to focus on prevention and protection.

Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease is also prevalent in British wild rabbits. It causes high fever, internal bleeding and liver disease. It is almost always fatal. Pet rabbits may be found dead with bloodstained fluid at their nose or no other visible signs. It is spread by rabbit-to-rabbit contact and persists in the environment (eg carriers). There is no treatment so vaccination is essential.

Prevention and protection

Rabbits should be vaccinated against Myxomatosis and Rabbit (Viral) Haemorrhagic Disease, to help protect against possible suffering. There is a new vaccination which combines Myxomatosis and RHD. This only needs to be given annually but we recommend a 6 month check up too as a lot can change in 6 months.

Ensure your pets are treated for fleas, as infection can be spread by insects. You should also regularly clean and disinfect your rabbit’s enclosure. If possible, prevent contact with wild or affected domestic rabbits and keep hutches away from ponds that may collect mosquitoes.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

Heatstroke

HOT

Dogs expel heat by panting; however, this is ineffective if the environment is too humid or hot. In cases of heat-stroke, a dog’s body temperature can rise over 42°c (normal body temperature is around 38°c).

Signs of heat-stroke

Signs of heat-stroke include panting excessively, anxious behaviour, very red gums (turning blue in extreme circumstances), salivating, very rapid heart rate, collapse, convulsions or shock.
Heat-stroke must be treated IMMEDIATELY otherwise it can be fatal.

What to do if your dog is suffering from heat-stroke:

Remove the dog from the hot environment.
Reduce the body temperature GRADUALLY by using a shower spray and fan (to increase air flow). Then douse the dog in cool water, especially the head and neck (DO NOT USE ICE COLD WATER) or cover your dog in wet sheets. Continue until his breathing starts to settle.
Allow your dog to drink as much as he wants in small quantities at a time.
Seek veterinary advice immediately as it can be difficult to be sure how serious the situation is and urgent treatment may be needed.

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk

The Yellow Dog Project: Some Dogs Need Space

The Official Yellow Dog UK poster

The Yellow Dog Project was created to bring awareness to dogs who need space while training, recovering from surgery, or being rehabilitated.

If you see a dog with a YELLOW ribbon, bandanna or similar on the leash or on the dog, this is a dog which needs some space. Please, do not approach this dog or its people with your dog. They are indicating that their dog cannot be close to other dogs. How close is too close? Only the dog or his people know, so maintain distance and give them time to move out of your way.

You can read more here: http://www.yellowdoguk.co.uk/

Lungworm

Lungworm dog and bone

The larvae of the lungworm parasite are carried by slugs, snails and frogs. They can cause a problem if the dog eats them either purposefully or accidently (by eating grass, drinking from puddles, etc). Dogs or foxes infected with lungworm can spread the parasite into the environment as the larvae are expelled in the animal’s poo.

Symptoms

After infection, you may see worsening signs of cardiac and respiratory disease. This can include a chronic cough that gets worse over time, exercise intolerance, difficulty breathing and weight loss. Initially symptoms are only seen at extremes of exercise, gradually becoming more obvious as the disease progresses. Affected dogs can develop a diarrhoea that rapidly becomes bloody. They may also bleed from the nose or elsewhere. Infection can cause serious health problems and even be fatal if untreated, so seek veterinary advice if you have any concerns.

Your vet may be able to diagnose lungworm by looking at your pets faeces under a microscope, examining their history, compatible clinical signs and response to treatment.

Prevention and treatment of lungworm

Dealing with the health problems caused by lung worm can be very difficult but killing the actual worm is relatively simple and cheap. We therefore recommend that you include lungworm treatment into your normal worming routine. Your vet will be able to advise you of the best product for your pet.

 

If you would like any more information then phone 01621 818282 (Tiptree Veterinary Centre) or 01206 561407 (Willows Veterinary Centre) to book an appointment with one of our vets. You can also visit our websites at http://www.tiptreevets.co.uk or http://www.willows-vets.co.uk